Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Worse Mandarin English Translation of Real Estate Terms

“方子” 一词 包括    各  种      形式 的  住房.



“Fāng zi”   yī cí   bāokuò     gè  zhǒng    xíngshì  de   zhùfáng.
“Fāng zi” a word includes each species   forms   of housing.
“Fāng zi” a word includes    various        forms   of housing.
The word fangzi  includes         all           forms   of housing.

Better Chinese Character Mandarin Pinyin English translation of Real Estate Terms

“方子” 一词 包括    各  种      形式 的  住房.

“Fāng zi”   yī cí   bāokuò     gè  zhǒng    xíngshì  de   zhùfáng.

“Fāng zi” a word includes each species   forms   of housing.

“Fāng zi” a word includes    various        forms   of housing.

The word “fāng zi”  includes         all           forms   of housing.

“别墅”是一   种   独立的   独  栋   房屋“方子”

“Biéshù” shì yī zhǒng    dúlì  de    dú dòng fángwū “fāng zi”
“Biéshù”       is  one (meas word) independent alone building    house    “fāng zi”
“Biéshù”       is  one (meas word) independent single family       house    “fāng zi”
“Biéshù” is a specific type of "fangzi" that is a detached single family house

“公玉”是 公共   公寓的 一个单位,可以在中国   拥有 长达40年。
 “Gōngyù” shì gōnggòng  gōng yù de  yīgè   dānwèi,  nǐ   kěyǐ      zài zhōngguó  yǒngyǒu   zhǎng dá 40 nián.
 “Gōngyù”  is public total  public apt    one        unit,  you  can        in     China    have hold   long upto 40 years.
 “Gōngyù”  is    publ ic       apartment   one        unit,  you  can        in     China        own              up to 40 years.
 "Gong yu" is one unit in a public apartment building that you can own up to 40 years in China.

“丹园楼”是您可以在中国 拥有70年的单元楼。
“Dānyuán lóu”     shì   nín    kěyǐ      zài zhōngguó yǒngyǒu   70 nián   de  dān yuán lóu.

“Dānyuán lóu”      is    you    can       in     China    have hold  70 years of single unit floor.
“Dānyuán lóu” is a single unit floor that you can own for 70 years in China.



"一      幢      房子"  是      整个     建筑   物
"一      幢      房子" shì zhěnggè jiànzhú wù

"一      幢      房子"  is the entire building
"Yī    chuáng  fángzi"    is  the   entire    building


"一  套   房子" 只是建筑物中的一个单位

"一  套   房子" zhǐshì jiànzhú wù zhòng de yīgè dānwèi

"一  套   房子" is just a single unit in the building
" Yī   tào   fángzi" is just a single unit in the building

Notes:
方子 - 房子
公寓-apartment (refers to the building style. It does not indicate whether you own it or just rent it.)

别墅-house
I used a delete line on "方子" because I know you mean "房子" and it is a typing mistake. And yes "方子" is an oral expression for prescription of Chinese traditional medicine. When it is about modern western medicine or in a formal way, we usually say "药方" or "处方".
“公寓” refers to the building style. It does not indicate whether you own it or just rent it.
In Chinese “X达..." always conveys a meaning that you are discribing a high level or a severe degree, such as "参与者多达十万人"(large amount), "费用高达五万元"(very expensive), ”车速高达150 km/h“(high speed), "寿命长达数百年"(very long life). Without this word, it is just a normal statement like "费用为五万元" and you don't know whether it is ordinary or extreme. I don't know if "up to" has this meaning.

And when you use "长" meaning length or long, it pronounces as "cháng", not "zhǎng". The latter one means grow or growth.


Westwood Oaks Real Estate Info 2017 November 21st

Westwood Oaks Real Estate Info 2017 November 21st
Westwood Oaks is a neighborhood in Santa Clara with Cupertino schools.

WestwoodOaks SFR MedianSalesPriceVsYearSold

MapView withThumbnail Westwood Oaks SFR List120Days 2017Nov12th

QuickCMA Westwood Oaks SFR List120Days 2017Nov12th

Friday, November 17, 2017

House For Sale 16809 Cory Drive Morgan Hill CA

House For Sale 16809 Cory Drive Morgan Hill CA:  Flyer: https://siliconvalleyhouses.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pf-16809-cory-drive-v7.pdf

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Westwood Oaks Real Estate Info 2017Nov12th

Westwood Oaks is a neighborhood in Santa Clara with Cupertino schools.

WestwoodOaks SFR MedianSalesPriceVsYearSold

MapView withThumbnail Westwood Oaks SFR List120Days 2017Nov12th

QuickCMA Westwood Oaks SFR List120Days 2017Nov12th

Friday, November 10, 2017

Landlord Notice to Sell the Property

When you decide to sell a rental property, you have one potentially unpleasant task ahead -- giving your tenants a notice to vacate. California has certain rules regarding how to go about doing this. It's important to familiarize yourself with these rules to ensure you do everything by the book so the process goes as smoothly as possible. The proper procedures vary according to particular circumstances.

How Much Time

You need to give a tenant who’s been in the property less than a year a 30-day notice to vacate, according to California law. If your tenant has been in the property for a year or more, you need to give him a 60-day written notice to vacate. Some exceptions to the 60-day rule exist, where you can reduce the 60 days to 30 days. The exceptions are as follows: you will sell the property to someone who will live there for at least a year; you must open an escrow account with an escrow or real estate agent; you must give the 30-day notice no later than 120 days after opening the escrow account; you canNOT have given your tenant a 30- or 60-day notice before; and the property must be one that can be sold separately from another dwelling.

Serving the Notice

You don’t need to let your tenant know why you’re giving him notice, but you do need to serve notice the proper way. One way is to send the 30- or 60-day notice by certified mail or registered mail with a return receipt requested. You can also have it served personally by having someone hand, or leave the notice with, your tenant. You can serve your tenant at work if you can’t contact him at home. If you do this, you also need to mail a copy of the notice to the home. If you can’t reach your tenant at home or at work, you can tape the notice on the front door or another place on the property where the tenant is likely to see it. You also need to mail a copy of the notice to the home. This procedure is sometimes called “nailing and mailing.”

Not Leaving

If the tenant stays past the end of the notice period, he’s there unlawfully, and you’ll need to file an unlawful detainer lawsuit to get him out. If you haven’t told the tenant you’re selling the property and he wants to stay, be prepared for him to bargain with you to stay. Tenants who don’t want to move often do this. You don’t need to withdraw your notice or explain why. Just reiterate that you expect him to be out per the terms of the notice.

Showing the Property

If you intend to show the property, your tenant will figure out that you’re selling it. According to California Civil Code Section 1954, you can enter the dwelling to exhibit it to prospective or actual buyers, but you need to follow some rules. You must show the property during normal business hours unless your tenant agrees to some other time, and you must give your tenant notice at least 24 hours in advance of your intent to enter the property. You can give notice orally by telephone or in person if you’ve notified the tenant your plans to sell in writing within 120 days of giving the oral notice to show the property.

From: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/landlord-notice-sell-property-47017.html

California Tenants Giving and Receiving Proper Notice

Giving and Receiving Proper Notice

Tenant's notice to end a periodic tenancy
To end a periodic rental agreement (for example, a month-to-month agreement), you must give your landlord proper written notice before you move.
You must give the landlord the same amount of notice as there are days between rent payments.193 This means that if you pay rent monthly, you must give the landlord written notice at least 30 days before you move. If you pay rent every week, you must give the landlord written notice at least seven days before you move.194 This is true even if the landlord has given you a 60-day notice to end the rental agreement and you want to leave sooner (see Landlord's notice to end a periodic tenancy.)195
If your rental agreement specifies a different amount of notice (for example 10 days), you must give the landlord written notice as required by the agreement.196
To avoid later disagreements, date the notice, state the date that you intend to move, and make a copy of the notice for yourself. It's best to deliver the notice to the landlord or property manager in person, or mail it by certified mail with return receipt requested. (You can also serve the notice by one of the methods described under "Proper Service of Notices".)197
You can give the landlord notice any time during the rental period, but you must pay full rent during the period covered by the notice. For example, say you have a month-to-month rental agreement, and pay rent on the first day of each month. You could give notice any time during the month (for example, on the tenth). Then, you could leave 30 days later (on the tenth of the following month, or earlier if you chose to). But you would have to pay rent for the first 10 days of the next month whether you stay for those 10 days or move earlier. (Exception: You would not have to pay rent for the entire 10 days if you left earlier, and the landlord rented the unit to another tenant during the 10 days, and the new tenant paid rent for all or part of the 10 days.)198
The rental agreement or lease must state the name and address of the person or entity to whom you must make rent payments (see When You Rent section).If this address does not accept personal deliveries, you can mail your notice to the owner at the name and address stated in the lease or rental agreement. If you can show proof that you mailed the notice to the stated name and address (for example, a receipt for certified mail), the law assumes that the notice is receivable by the owner on the date of postmark.199
Landlord's notice to end a periodic tenancy
A landlord can end a periodic tenancy (for example, a month-to-month tenancy) by giving the tenant proper advance written notice. Your landlord must give you 60 days advance written notice that the tenancy will end if you and every other tenant or resident have lived in the rental unit for a year or more.201 However, the landlord must give you 30 days advance written notice in either of the following situations:
  • Any tenant or resident has lived in the rental unit less than one year;202 or
  • The landlord has contracted to sell the rental unit to another person who intends to occupy it for at least a year after the tenancy ends. In addition, all of the following must be true in order for the selling landlord to give you a 30-day notice
  1. The landlord must have opened escrow with a licensed escrow agent or real estate broker, and
  2. The landlord must have given you the 30-day notice no later than 120 days after opening the escrow, and
  3. The landlord must not previously have given you a 30-day or 60-day notice, and
  4. The rental unit must be one that can be sold separately from any other dwelling unit. (For example, a house or a condominium can be sold separately from another dwelling unit.) 203
The landlord usually is NOT required to state a reason for ending the tenancy in the 30-day or 60-day notice (see "Thirty-Day or Sixty-Day Notice"). The landlord can serve the 30-day or 60-day notice by certified mail or by one of the methods described under "Proper Service of Notices".204
Note: In the circumstances described in the Three Day Notice section, the landlord can give the tenant just three days' advance written notice.
If you receive a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must leave the rental unit by the end of the 30th or 60th day after the date on which the landlord served the notice (see Written Notices of Termination). For example, if the landlord served a 60-day notice on July 16, you would begin counting the 60 days on July 17, and the 60-day period would end on September 14. If September 14 falls on a weekday, you would have to leave on or before that date. However, if the end of the 60-day period falls on a Saturday, you would not have to leave until the following Monday, because Saturdays and Sundays are legal holidays. Other legal holidays also extend the notice period.205
If you don't move by the end of the notice period, the landlord can file an unlawful detainer lawsuit to evict you (see The Eviction Process).
What if the landlord has given you a 60-day notice, but you want to leave sooner? You can give the landlord the same amount of notice as there are days between rent payments (for example, 30 days' notice if you pay rent monthly) provided that -
  • The amount of your notice is at least as long as the number of days between rent payments, and
  • Your proposed termination date is before the landlord's termination date.206
What if the landlord has given you a 30-day or 60-day notice, but you want to continue to rent the property, or you believe that you haven't done anything to cause the landlord to give you a notice of termination? In this kind of situation, you can try to convince the landlord to withdraw the notice. Try to find out why the landlord gave you the notice. If it's something within your control (for example, consistently late rent, or playing music too loud), assure the landlord that in the future, you will pay on time or keep the volume turned down. Then, keep your promise. If the landlord won't withdraw the notice, you will have to move out at the end of the 30-day or 60-day period, or be prepared for the landlord to file an unlawful detainer lawsuit to evict you.
Special rules may apply in cities with rent control. For example, in some communities with rent control ordinances, a periodic tenancy cannot be ended by the landlord without a good faith "just cause" or "good cause" reason to evict. In these communities, the landlord must state the reason for the termination, and the reason may be reviewed by local housing authorities.
Suppose that you are a tenant who participates in the Section 8 housing voucher program. While the lease is in effect, the landlord must have good cause to terminate (end) the tenancy. Examples of good cause include serious or repeated violations of the lease, or criminal activity that threatens the health or safety of other residents.207 However, incidents of domestic violence may not be used as a violation by the victim or threatened victim as good cause for the landlord to terminate the tenancy, occupancy rights or assistance of the victim.208
The landlord must give the tenant a three-day or 30-day or 60-day notice of termination under California law (see "Written Notices of Terminations"), and both the landlord and the tenant must give the public housing agency a copy of the notice.209 What if the landlord simply decides not to renew the lease, or decides to terminate the HAP (housing assistance payment) contract? In this case, the landlord must give the tenant 90 days' advance written notice of the termination date.210 If the tenant doesn't move out by the end of the 90 days, the landlord must follow California law to evict the tenant.211
If you live in government-assisted housing or in an area with rent control, check with your local housing officials to see if any special rules apply in your situation.

ADVANCE PAYMENT OF LAST MONTH'S RENT

Many landlords require tenants to pay "last month's rent" at the beginning of the tenancy as part of the security deposit or at the time the security deposit is paid. Whether the tenant can use this amount at the end of the tenancy to pay the last month's rent depends on the language used in the rental agreement or lease.212
Suppose that at the beginning of the tenancy, you gave the landlord a payment for the last month's rent and for the security deposit, and that the lease or rental agreement labels part of this up front payment "last month's rent." In this situation, you have paid the rent for your last month in the rental unit. However, sometimes landlords raise the rent before the last month's rent becomes due. In this situation, can the landlord require you to pay the amount of the increase for the last month?
The law does not provide a clear answer to this question. If your lease or rental agreement labels part of your up front payment "last month's rent," then you have a strong argument that you paid the last month's rent when you moved in. In this situation, the landlord should not be able to require you to pay the amount of the increase for the last month.213 However, if your lease or rental agreement labels part of your up front payment "security for last month's rent," then the landlord has a good argument that you have not actually paid the last month's rent, but have only provided security for it. In this situation, the landlord could require you to pay the amount of the increase for the last month.
For example, say that your rental agreement labeled part of the total deposit that you paid when you moved in "security for last month's rent," or that "last month's rent" is one of the items listed in your rental agreement under the heading "Security." Suppose that your rent was $500 when you moved in and that you paid your landlord $500 as ";security for the last month's rent." Suppose that you also paid your landlord an additional $500 as a security deposit. If the landlord properly raised your rent to $550 while you were living in the rental unit, you can expect to owe the landlord $50 for rent during the last month of your tenancy (that is, the current rent [$550] minus the prepaid amount [$500] equals $50 owed).
If your rental agreement calls your entire up front payment a "security deposit" and does not label any part of it "last month's rent," or "security for last month's rent," then you will have to pay the last month's rent when it comes due. In this situation, you cannot use part of your security deposit to pay the last month's rent. However, you will be entitled to a refund of your security deposit, as explained in the next section.

193 Civil Code Section 1946.
194 Civil Code Section 1946.
195 Civil Code Section 1946.1(e).
196 Civil Code Section 1946. 
197 Civil Code Section 1946.
198 See Brown, Warner and Portman, The California Landlord's Law Book, Vol. I: Rights & Responsibilities, pages 357-358 (NOLO Press 2011).
199 Civil Code Section 1962(f).
200 Civil Code Section 1946.7.

200.1 Code of Civil procedure Section 1161.3.
200.2 Civil Code Section 1941.5, 1941.6.
201 Civil Code Section 1946.1(b).
202 Civil Code Section 1946. Civil Code Section 1946.1(c).
203 Civil Code Section 1946.1(d).
204 Civil Code Section 1946.1(f).
205 Code of Civil Procedure Section 12a. See California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 7:220 to 7:220.6 (Rutter Group 2011) on whether service of the 30-day notice by mail extends the time for the tenant to respond.
206 Civil Code Section 1946.1(e).
207 California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraphs 12:251 and following (Rutter Group 2011). See this chapter for an indepth discussion of the Section 8 housing program.
208 California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 12:250 and 12:273.1 (Rutter Group 2011) citing United States Code Sections 1437f(d)(1)(5), 1437f(c)(9)(B); 24 CFR sections 5.2005(a), 982, 452(b)(1).
209 Moskovitz, California Eviction Defense Manual, Section 18.22 (Cal. Cont. Ed. Bar 2011), citing Gallman v. Pierce (ND Cal. 1986) 639 F. Supp. 472, 485 (landlord must follow California law when terminating a tenant's Section 8 lease).
210 Civil Code Section 1954.535; Wasatch Property Management v. Degrate (2005) 35 Cal.4th 1111 [29 Cal.Rptr.3d 262].
211 California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 12:301(Rutter Group 2009).
212Brown, Warner and Portman, The California Landlord's Law Book, Vol. I: Rights & Responsibilities, pages 96-97 (NOLO Press 2011).
213 Portman and Brown, California Tenants' Rights, page 243 (NOLO Press 2010); see Brown, Warner and Portman, The California Landlord's Law Book, Vol. I: Rights & Responsibilities, pages 96-97 (NOLO Press 2011).